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Better Late Than Never? - Elizabeth Unexplained
Lots of data but no answers
greyautumnrain
greyautumnrain
Better Late Than Never?
This week's memo from Margaret's school mentioned that a child in the school had socially transitioned from female to male, and talked about how we should talk about this to our kids. This may have been more timely if it had come back in October. You see the kid is in Margaret's class, the transition happened at the beginning of the school year, and the talking about it (such as there was) has already happened.

I get the school being silent about it for so long. Obviously there are privacy considerations. This is why I haven't posted about it previously, but with the public school memo I figured mentioning it was OK. What I wonder is why they are offering simplistic and slightly condescending advice on talking about it now when the transition happened months ago. It's not like six-year-olds are going to not notice and not say anything about their classmate who used to be a girl but is now has a boy's haircut, clothes and name. On the plus side the six-year-olds are pretty understanding of the change.

I will say that I was a little taken aback at first at such a young kid identifying as trans, but it's not my kid so I have to assume that the family is handling this reasonably, and it does seem that there are more kids identifying as trans early. I do wonder if there would be so many trans folks if we didn't pack so much extra garbage onto the whole gender thing. If people weren't so very keen about telling little girls and little boys what they ought to like and how they ought to play maybe fewer kids would be unhappy with the parts they were born with. I don't know. I'm a happy XX person with female parts who is happy to be the way I am but still OK liking "guy" things like science and computers, and I'm happy to have a very femme look because I don't feel limited by being female. To my way of thinking my gender simply dictates the reproductive stuff, everything else is fluff. I have trouble imagining what it would feel like to be unhappy with my gender, but that doesn't mean I can't be supportive and understanding of those who find themselves in that position. I just wish society wasn't so caught with the supposed differences between the genders.
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chenoameg From: chenoameg Date: April 11th, 2015 01:43 pm (UTC) (Link)
I am reading a book about feminism by a transgender woman, and for her it is not so much the gender expression as the feeling she was in the wrong body. (It's called Whipping Girl, I am finding it interesting.)
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